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Fellows Family Dental | FAQ in Pocatello

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1598 Delphic Way Suite B
Pocatello, ID 83201

208-237-4357

FAQ
 

I need dental work done but have no insurance, what can I do?

What are UCR fees, how are they determined and how do they affect me?

What can I do to keep my mouth healthy during my pregnancy?

How old should a child be when they visit the dentist for the first time?

What is baby bottle tooth decay?

Can baby bottle tooth decay be prevented?

How do I prevent tooth decay (cavities)?

How do I control bad breath?


 

I need dental work done but have no insurance, what can I do?

Dr. Fellows has a few options for those patients without dental insurance:

  • We except Visa, MasterCard, & debit cards
  • Post dated checks
  • Special dental institutions such as Care Credit
  • With prior financial arrangements with our financial coordinator, Dr. Fellows will carry the balance up to 90 days.

 

What are UCR fees, how are they determined and how do they affect me?

"Usual, Customary and Reasonable" (UCR) programs usually allow patients to go to the dentist of their choice. These plans pay a set percentage of the dentist's ("usual") fee or the Insurance Company's "reasonable" or "customary" fee limit-whichever is less. These limits are a result of a contract between your employer (the plan purchaser) and the insurance company (the third party payer). Although these limits are called "customary," they may or may not accurately reflect the fees that area dentists charge. There is a wide fluctuation and lack of government regulation on how an insurance companies determines the "customary" fee level. Consequently, when a dentist's fee exceeds your plan's "Reasonable and Customary" fee, it does not mean your dentist has overcharged for the procedure.

 

What can I do to keep my mouth healthy during my pregnancy?

Your oral health is an important part of your overall health, and good oral health habits not only help prevent oral problems during pregnancy, they also affect the health of your unborn child. During pregnancy, your body's hormone levels rise considerably. Gingivitis, especially common during the second to eighth months of pregnancy, may cause red, puffy or tender gums that tend to bleed when you brush. This sensitivity is an exaggerated response to plaque and is caused by an increased level of progesterone in your system. Dr. Fellows may recommend more frequent cleanings during your pregnancy to help you avoid problems.

 

How old should a child be when they visit the dentist for the first time?

Dr. Fellows follows the American Dental Association recommendations which suggests the first visit should be at the child's first birthday.

 

What is baby bottle tooth decay?

Decay in infants and toddlers is called baby bottle tooth decay. It can destroy the teeth and most often occurs in the upper front teeth. But other teeth may also be affected. Decay occurs when sweetened liquids are given and are left clinging to an infant's teeth for long periods. These liquids include milk, formula, and fruit juice. Bacteria in the mouth use these sugars as food. They then produce acids that attack the teeth. Each time your child drinks these liquids; acids attack for 20 minutes or longer. After many attacks, the teeth can decay.

 

Can baby bottle tooth decay be prevented?

Definitely. Sometimes parents don't realize that a baby's teeth can decay soon after they appear in the mouth. By the time decay is noticed, it may be to late to save the teeth. You can prevent this from happening by following the suggestions below:

  • After each feeding, wipe the baby's gums with a clean gauze pad. Begin brushing your child's teeth when the first tooth erupts. Clean and massage gums in areas that remain toothless, and begin flossing when all the baby teeth have erupted, usually by age 2 or 2½.
  • Never allow your child to fall asleep with a bottle containing milk, formula, fruit juice or sweetened liquids.
  • If your child needs a comforter between regular feedings, at night, or during naps, give the child a clean pacifier recommended by your dentist or physician. Never give your child a pacifier dipped in any sweet liquid.
  • Avoid filling your child's bottle with liquids such as sugar water and soft drinks.
  • If your local water supply does not contain fluoride (a substance that helps prevent tooth decay), ask your dentist how your child should get it.
  • Start dental visits by the child's first birthday. Make visits regular. If you think your child has dental problems, take the child to the dentist as soon as possible.

 

How do I prevent tooth decay (cavities)?

You can help prevent tooth decay by following these tips:

  • Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste.
  • Clean between your teeth daily with floss.
  • Eat nutritious and balanced meals and limit snacking.
  • Check with your dentist about use of supplemental fluoride, which strengthens your teeth, and about use of dental sealants (a plastic protective coating) applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth to protect them from decay.
  • Visit your dentist every six months for professional cleanings and oral examination.

 

How do I control bad breath?

Schedule regular dental visits for a professional cleaning and checkup. Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste to remove food debris and plaque. Brush your tongue, too. Once a day, use dental floss. One of the warning signs of periodontal (gum) disease is persistent bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth. Periodontal disease is caused by plaque, the sticky, colorless film of bacteria that constantly forms on teeth. The bacteria create toxins that irritate the gums. In the advanced stage of the disease, the gums, bone and other structures that support the teeth become damaged. With regular dental checkups, your dentist can detect and treat periodontal disease early.